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Become a Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed Guardian!

Learn best lake management tips, protect the water — seen and unseen — add value to your property!

Take the Pledge to Protect here.

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2018 Discovery Boat Registration Now Open

Education, News May 4, 2018 No Response

Registration for GLA’s 2018 Discovery Boat cruises is now open to the public! Plan a memorable outing to enjoy a scenic, summertime cruise while also learning about the wonder of our freshwater lakes.

Schedule the date and time that works for you at this link to our GLA Event Calendar. It’s not too soon to plan on enjoying a Discovery Boat cruise with your friends and family – and they’ll thank you for it!

Join Glen Lake Association’s Watershed Biologist, Rob Karner, on a pontoon boat for a two hour scientific study of Glen Lake. Using various scientific equipment, students learn all about plankton, water chemistry, Swimmer’s Itch life cycle, hydrology, bottom sediments, aquatic succession, and aquatic plants.

Also learn about and see a plankton net, a compound microscope, Ekman Dredge, sonar devices, aqua view underwater camera, and the hydrolab.

Note: Children under 5 years not allowed. Children 5-10 years must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. If possible, please bring life jackets for children.

Download the liability release form here, which is required for all participants. Registration price is per person. Please add additional people in your group as “Guests” under the primary registration.

GLA reserves the right to cancel due to weather conditions. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to starting time.

We look forward to having you and sharing our love of Glen Lake! It’s going to be a great summer.

Best regards,
Glen Lake Association

 

 

 


Recent Graduate/ Newly Retired?

Get Involved, News April 24, 2018 No Response

The Glen Lake Association has an environmental protection job opportunity available.

Work outdoors while helping to keep Glen Lake waters free from invasive species. This opportunity involves educating boaters, power washing of boats and generally being an ambassador for the GLA efforts to protect Glen Lake. And your place of work is at the Little Glen boat launch – a beautiful, natural outdoor location.

Work 25 – 30 hours per week, Memorial Day through the end of October. Starting compensation is $11 per hour. Please call (231) 835-0118. We look forward to working with you!


New DNR Permit Aims to Reduce Swimmer’s Itch

Education, News April 3, 2018 No Response

A recent article in the Traverse City Record Eagle April 1 mentions our watershed biologist, Rob Karner, and his insight on a new DNR permit targeting the common merganser duck. The goal of the permit, which allows for the killing or relocation of the ducks, is to reduce the occurrence of Swimmer’s Itch. The duck is the main host for the tapeworm that starts the cycle of swimmer’s itch

Read the full article here:

Karner, as well as most lake association presidents, doesn’t plan on killing the ducks, choosing instead to relocate them.

The following except is from the April 1 Record Eagle article.

“Rob Karner, a watershed biologist with the Glen Lake Association, said it’s much more effective to trap and relocate the ducks. Under the DNR permit there is a limit to how many can be killed in the off season.

“If you have a permit to shoot 25 ducks and there are 100 or more, the cycle continues,” Karner said.

Live trapping has no limit.

“That really has a larger impact on breaking the life cycle,” he said.

While some people think that all mergansers are to blame, only about half of them are infected, Karner said. Most of them are young birds, as the older ones have developed an immunity, he said.”

Read the full article here.

“The state requires that only licensed contractors do the trapping and relocating. The birds can also only be relocated to DNR-approved public areas where there are no snails in the waters. They also have to be sites where mergansers have been spotted and can survive.

Two such places are in Suttons Bay and on Lake Huron, Wynne said.

Karner said he’s glad the science has finally caught up to the application.

“We’ve bridged the gap between pure research and applied science,” he said.