4th of July Parade

It was a glorious day for a parade and, once again, the Glen Lake Association was represented by Geoff Davey and his Ski Nautique boat, Kate & Brian Davey, Owen & Gus Johnson, and Andrew & Evan Miller.

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Thank you to all our members who continue “protecting our watershed for generations”.  It’s all about the water!

Dredge Is Complete!

We’re happy to report that the dredge of Hatlem Pond was completed on Monday, June 23rd, 2014. While the dredging period was slightly longer than originally anticipated, the good news is that we have successfully dredged the entire pond with a single dredge. Therefore, there will not be a need for a second dredge next Spring, and the property owner can begin to restore the dredge retention area along Plowman Road at some point when it is safe to work on the spoils area.

While there were one or two incidents during the dredge when the sediment in Hatlem Creek was higher than we desired, be assured that we regularly took turbidity readings (cloudiness or haziness of water due to suspended particles) several times each day to make sure sediment flows were maintained at low levels. We also took e-coli readings along the Glen Lake shoreline to make sure normal levels were maintained. While some added sedimentation into Glen Lake during the dredge was unavoidable, we believe it is a small price to pay given its benefits—reduced sediment levels over the next 15-20 years and the removal of all the sediment in Hatlem Pond.

We greatly appreciate the cooperation of all riparians throughout this process, particularly those along the southeast shore. We’re confident that you will see the positive results of this dredge for many years to come.

We will continue our ongoing monitoring of the water in Hatlem Creek and work with the property owner as we make recommendations for site restoration. We will also be pursuing other related projects, including possible pond aeration and upstream erosion management, to reduce the buildup of sediment in the pond in the future.

While funding for the dredge has gone very well, we are still a little short of our goal of $290,000. If you haven’t made a pledge toward the dredge, please consider making one today. Amounts pledged in excess of the actual cost of the dredge will be restricted and will only be used to further improve the Hatlem Creek watershed.

Thanks again for your cooperation and support.

The Glen Lake Association

2014 Annual Meeting

The 2014 Annual Meeting will take place at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, August 9 in the Auditeria at the Glen Lake Community Schools, 3375 W. Burdickville Rd., Maple City. Displays will be available an hour prior to the meeting, and all are invited to stay for lunch following the meeting.

Dredge Update 6/19/14

The good news is we are closing in on the final days of the dredge. Exactly how many more days of dredging depends on the controllable and uncontrollable circumstances. Below are some challenges we still face in the final days and how we intend to adjust/react to each one of them:

A significant rain event(s) – we will slow down the dredging process and dewater Hatlem Pond as much as possible.

Spoils Deposition Area – we will slow down the dredging operations as the sediment accumulates.

Silt Curtains – we started with four and now we are down to two as we approach the finish line. These curtains are removed as the dredge moves past their current position. As the dredge operations get closer to the earth dam and silt curtains have been removed, we will have to slow down the dredge operations.

Hatlem Pond Levels – we currently are dewatering the pond as much as we can due to recent rain and high water levels. We will dewater the pond as slowly as we can balanced with keeping the dredge operations going.

Winds – south winds are best, north winds are the worst. East winds are better than west winds. The best winds help clear up the water and the worst wind directions will cause us to slow down the dredge operations.

Logs – the more logs found at the bottom of the pond, the less water quality we can maintain. Each submerged log that has collided with the dredge machine needs to be pulled out of the pond and that has a negative impact on the water quality.

E.coli – we have monitored this and found dredging by itself does not create unsafe water. However, if a significant rain event occurs (at least 1-3 inches of rain in a 24 hour period), E.coli levels would likely be elevated and precautions should be taken when considering whether or not swimming is advisable.

In summary, we need to slow down dredge operations for most circumstances listed above and at the same time, go as fast as we can to make it to the finish line and not dredge past June 27th.

Thank you for your patience during the final days of the dredge. I am confident that the shallow waters of Big Glen near the outlet of Hatlem Creek will clear up as the Fourth of July Holiday approaches. Also, thank you for your financial support of this important project.

Respectfully submitted,

Rob Karner M.S.
Watershed Biologist

Dredge Update 6/16/14

As previously reported, the dredging of the pond began a little over two weeks ago, on May 28th. To date, the dredge has gone very well, and it is scheduled to be completed around June 27th. While this is slightly longer than originally anticipated, the good news is that we believe the entire pond can be dredged during this period, thereby eliminating the need for a second dredge next year. This will enable the property owner to begin restoring , this Fall, the dredge retention area along Plowman Rd to its natural state.

While there have been one or two incidents during the dredge when the sediment in Hatlem Creek was higher than we desired, be assured that we have been taking turbidity readings (cloudiness or haziness of water due to suspended particles) several times each day to make sure sediment flows are maintained at low levels. We also have taken e-coli readings along the Glen Lake shoreline to make sure normal levels are maintained. While some added sedimentation into Glen Lake during the dredge was unavoidable, we believe it is a small price to pay given its benefits—reduced sediment levels over the next 15-20 years and removal of about 9,000 cubic yards of sediment from the Hatlem Creek watershed.

We greatly appreciate the cooperation and support of riparians throughout this process. We’re confident that you will see the positive results of this dredge for many years to come.

The Glen Lake-Crystal River Watershed Management Plan

In 2002 the Glen Lake Association partnered with the Leelanau Conservancy to develop a watershed management plan as a guide for preservation and restoration of the Glen Lake-Crystal River watershed. Matt Heiman and Megan Woller of the Leelanau Conservancy prepared the plan. It was jointly funded by the Glen Lake Association and the Leelanau Conservancy. Plan approval was given by the MDEQ in January 2003.

Michigan is subdivided into discrete areas by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to define major and sub-watersheds to encourage local entities to create plans for protection, and/or restoration of water resources. The MDEQ specifies what a plan must address. The plans are intended to help local units of government, nonprofit organizations, and citizens evaluate and prioritize plans for action. Education of local citizens is a major objective.

After a plan is approved by the MDEQ, local units of government and nonprofit organizations may submit grant applications for Clean Michigan Initiative (CMI) funding to implement portions of their plan. The CMI is a multi-million dollar environmental bond initiative overwhelmingly approved by Michigan voters in 1998. The CMI designated $165 million for water quality projects, including implementing approved watershed management plans.

Four years after the 2003 Glen Lake-Crystal River Watershed plan was approved, the same partners regrouped to update the plan to include additional information according to newly implemented EPA requirements. This 2009 updated 10 year plan included additional information on pollutant sources, fisheries management, critical areas of the watershed measurable milestones to guide the plan implementation process, and a set of criteria to evaluate effectiveness of implementation efforts. The Friends of the Crystal River joined with the GLA and the Leelanau Conservancy to fund this updated plan. The update was prepared by Sarah U’Ren of the Watershed Center.

The watershed goals, objectives, and recommendations are as follows:

• Establish and promote educational programs that support stewardship and watershed planning goals, activities, and programs.
• Preserve the distinctive character and aesthetic qualities of the watershed, including viewsheds and scenic hillsides.
• Provide guidance for the implementation of actions:
So that the watershed can continue to support their appropriate designated and desired uses while maintaining its distinctive environmental characteristics and aquatic biological communities
• Develop six broad goals by the project steering committee to:
Protect the integrity of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems within the watershed.
Protect and improve the quality of water resources within the watershed.
Establish and promote land and water management practices that conserve and   protect the natural resources of the watershed.
Enhance the quality of recreational opportunities.
Establish and promote educational programs that support stewardship and watershed planning goals, activities, and programs.
Preserve the distinctive character and aesthetic qualities of the watershed, including viewsheds and scenic hillsides.

Particular critical focus areas for the GL-CR watershed include roughly a quarter of the watershed and identify the following areas:
• Riparian Corridors: Areas within 1,000 feet of bodies of water
• Forested Ridgelines: Steep, forested slopes comprised of highly permeable soils susceptible to erosion, which drain directly into Glen Lake or its tributaries
• Hatlem Creek Subwatershed: ecologically rich wetland complex
• Crystal River Dune Swale Complex: rare and ecologically rich dune swale complex
• Groundwater Recharge Areas: Areas where there is a greater amount of groundwater recharge (significant overlap with Hatlem Creek area).

To date, the Glen Lake Association has received a $14,344 two year grant for testing stream and ground water inlet nutrients and other annually conducted water quality testing activities by Rob Karner, our watershed biologist.

The Leelanau Conservancy has received $375,000 for their Glen Lake/Crystal River Permanent Land Protection Project, conducted September 2005 through December 2008. This project established 3 permanent conservation easements that protect 44.14 acres and 3696 feet of frontage along the Crystal River, and groundwater fed tributary streams flowing into Glen Lake.

Our watershed local units of government and the GLA including other non-profit partners should be able to apply for grants to fund water quality related projects through 2019.

To view the Glen Lake-Crystal River Watershed Plan, click the MDEQ link below:

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/deq/ess-nps-wmp-glen-lake-crystal-river_208916_7.pdf

Dredge Update 5/29/14

Today concludes the third day of the dredge, so we wanted to provide everyone with a brief update regarding its progress. The good news is that all the dredging equipment is in place, the dredging has begun, and noise and odor smells are at acceptable levels. Unfortunately, getting the equipment in place in the pond caused significantly more sediment disruption than we anticipated, resulting in unacceptable levels of sediment downstream in Hatlem Creek and then into Glen Lake. Also contributing to the sediment overload was the fact the spoils area filled up faster than anticipated, so water was released back into the watershed too early.

We are working with our engineering firm and the dredger to address these issues and put in place other intervention strategies, which should reduce the sediment flowing into the lake during the dredge. We will continue taking sediment readings several times each day to monitor this situation and make sure the interventions we’ve put in place are working.

It is important to remember that there will be some degree of turbid water during the three weeks of dredging. We believe it is a small price to pay for securing the promise of far less sedimentation in the future.

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