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Year End Highlights

Education, Get Involved, sticky December 6, 2016 No Response

With 2016 drawing to a close, we ask you to give consideration to the Glen Lake Association in your year-end gift planning.  While the Association remains on a strong financial foundation, we will likely finish the 2016 year with a small operating deficit. This is because of conscious decisions our Board made to elevate the Swimmers’ Itch spring Merganser harassment campaign, investment to upgrade our database technology, and the design of our new website. We anticipate future cost savings in printing and postage among other communication benefits with our technology upgrades.

 

Crystal River Marina

Listed below are some of the highlights of 2016 reflecting our mission to preserve and protect Glen Lake now and for future generations:

  • Continued high level of water quality with no evidence of new invasive species.
  • Recognition for our work by many regional and statewide organizations resulting in a $250,000 shared grant from the Michigan DNR to provide swimmers’ itch research.
  • A newly designed and interactive website providing for ease of member use, event enrollment and informative video postings.
  • Continued support of the position of watershed biologist Rob Karner who serves as an expert consultant for all water quality programs.
  • Expansion of the Discovery Boat program led by Rob Karner, which serves to educate riparians about the preservation of Glen Lake.  All members are encouraged to attend.
  • A significant increase of our “Legends” endowment program where members include the Glen Lake Association in their estate plans.
  • Sponsorship of two educational workshops on best practices for replanting and landscaping after the great storm of 2015.
  • Extension of the Guardian program to include landscape professionals emphasizing their commitment to best practices for lake quality protection.

Membership dues provide only a portion of the annual costs to underwrite our expenses. Therefore, as you consider your year-end charitable giving, I would encourage you to include an additional contribution to help protect Glen Lake and the surrounding watershed. A separate email reminder for 2017 dues will be sent in early December, as you may also want to prepay your dues for tax purposes in 2016. Both donations and dues are tax deductible.

Sincerely,

Bill Witler, President

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To donate by mail please send to: The Glen Lake Association, P.O. Box 551, Glen Arbor, MI 49636.


Plankton from Lake to Lab

Education December 6, 2016 No Response

Plankton (microscopic free floating organisms) are a very important aspect of the ecology of the lakes within the Glen Lake/Crystal River Watershed. This video highlights the method by which the plankton are collected in our lakes using a plankton net along with locations in our watershed where we collect the plankton and how often they are collected. The plankton samples are analyzed in the laboratory using a compound microscope. We especially look for a rich biodiversity and whether we are encountering any invasive species. This video features Laura Wiesen and Rob Karner as the plankton peeps who do the collecting and analyzing.


Water level basics

Education November 7, 2016 No Response

Ever wonder what determines the water level of Glen Lake and consequently the water flow in the Crystal River? If so, read on. The next few paragraphs will briefly outline where the water comes from, where it goes, and the management plan philosophy we have developed to serve the Glen Lake-Crystal River community.

The water comes from the precipitation we receive throughout the year in the form of rain and snow. It finds its way into the lake two different ways: directly from the sky and through the surrounding area which is called the Glen Lake watershed. The water that flows in from the surrounding streams and underground springs (predominantly located along the East and South shores of Big Glen) contributes significantly, but water seeps in from all the hills and lands surrounding the lake. This watershed rain and snow melt filters through the surrounding properties, lawns, and forests down through the sand and gravel into the lake. Fortunately this filtration has a significant time lag so we continue to have water coming into the lake during the dry weeks of the summer. Something to keep in mind is that any chemicals, fertilizers, fuels, or septage that is spread, spilled or buried in the watershed eventually makes its way into the lakes too. So the importance of keeping ground and streams clean is obvious.

See the report.